Govt Sites Hacked Following Arrest of Alleged Jember Hacker

By webadmin on 03:52 pm Jan 30, 2013
Category Archive

Jakarta Globe

At least seven Indonesian government agencies’ websites were hacked as of Wednesday morning in retaliation against the arrest of an alleged hacker from the East Java town of Jember.

Police on Tuesday arrested Wildan Yani S. Hari, 22, an operator of an Internet cafe in Jember, for allegedly hacking the official presidential site, presidensby.info, earlier this month.

In what were reportedly acts of solidarity for Wildan, anonymous hackers hacked at least seven sites, including those of the Justice and Human Rights Ministry, the Social Affairs Ministry, the Tourism and Creative Economy Ministry, the Central Statistics Agency (BPS), the Business Competition Supervisory Commission (KPPU) and the Indonesian Embassy in Taskhent.

Visitors were welcomed by a page that read “No Army Can Stop An Idea…” when they tried to access the sites from Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, according to Indonesian news portal vivanews.com.

The seven websites had returned to normal at the time of writing on Wednesday afternoon.

Wildan also won support on Twitter, with supporters using the hashtag #OpFreeWildan in their tweets, condemning the police arrest and the jail sentence he may face. The sanction could far outstrip many penalties handed down to corrupt officials and perpetrators of more serious crimes, they lamented.

Other Twitter users said Indonesian authorities should instead be thanking Wildan for pointing out government websites’ weak security.

“Government of Indonesia, you cannot arrest an idea NO ARMY CAN STOP US #Anonymous #OpFreeWildan #FreeAnon,” a tweet by @An0nPun1shm3nt, has been retweeted at least 160 times.

Wildan is a graduate of a vocational school specializing in computer science, but learned how to hack on his own and has hacked many sites, police said on Tuesday.

He has been charged with two articles under the Telecommunications Law and the Electronic Information and Transactions Law, which carries with it a maximum sentence of seven years in prison.