Jakarta Finished, e-KTP Registration Rolls On

By webadmin on 12:16 am May 01, 2012
Category Archive

Lenny Tristia Tambun & Robertus Wardi

Home Affairs Minister Gamawan Fauzi said on Monday that the government’s e-KTP program was running smoothly and that three provinces, including Jakarta, had finished registering residents for the new identity cards.

“We have declared the Jakarta regional administration as having 100 percent completed the e-KTP data registration,” the minister said.

Jakarta began registration last August, followed shortly by Yogyakarta, Aceh, South Sumatra, Jakarta and Bangka-Belitung.

Home Affairs Ministry spokesman Reydonnyzar Moenek said the two other regions to have completed the registration process were South Sumatra and Bangka-Belitung.

“I have not received the latest report, but we continue to work and, after these two last days, the totals must certainly have reached 67 million,” Gamawan said, referring to the target number of total registrations that had been set for the end of April.

Reydonnyzar said the 67 million people had been registered in 197 districts and municipalities across the nation. By October, he said, the government hopes to have registered 105 million more people across 300 districts and municipalities.

“We are optimistic that we will reach this goal, and thus far we do not anticipate any serious obstacles,” Reydonnyzar said.
“Everything is going according to plan.”

The registration process has not been quite as cut-and-dried as that, however.

Jakarta Governor Fauzi Bowo said the data registration process had found that some 90,000 e-KTP registrants in the city had registered twice or were registered in more than one region.

“The fingerprints are verified and they show whether someone is also registered elsewhere. If found to have applied for double e-KTPs, then the person will have to choose one and cancel the other,” Fauzi said.

Despite the Jakarta deadline passing, Gamawan said data collection in the area would continue through the end of the year, allowing for new applicants.

The requirements will remain the same: recommendations from the local neighborhood and community units, a copy of the family card and, for those moving to a new part of the country, a letter of origin from the region they left.

Also on Monday, squatters from Tanah Merah in North Jakarta rallied at City Hall, asking to be allowed to register for the e-KTP. The
Jakarta administration has refused to recognize the people living on the government-owned land — which holds a gas pipeline and is deemed uninhabitable — as residents.

Gamawan said people who had completed their registration correctly would receive their cards within one week.

“If they are not 100 percent complete, how can the region verify them?” he said.

Purba Hutapea, the head of Jakarta’s Population and Civil Registry Office, said the e-KTP would continue to be free of charge.

As of Jan. 1, 2013, the previously issued KTP identity cards will no longer be valid.