Real Mr. Bean Tells Indonesia to Brace for Disappointment

By webadmin on 05:30 pm Jun 09, 2012
Category Archive

Jakarta Globe

A day after the premier of Indonesian horror movie “Mr. Bean Kesurupan Depe,” (Mr. Bean Obsessed With Depe), Rowan Atkinson warned Indonesian audiences to be aware that he was not starring in the film.

“Hello Mr Bean fans in Indonesia, we have just heard that there is a new film out in Indonesia with ‘Mr Bean’ in the title,” the real Mr. Bean, Atkinson, wrote on his official Facebook page on Friday. “Please be aware that it has nothing to do with your beloved Mr Bean or Mr Rowan Atkinson so please avoid being disappointed.”

In the film, an unidentified actor claiming to also be from the United Kingdom impersonates Mr. Bean as a pocong (Indonesian ghost). “Bean Kesurupan Depe,” produced by K2K Production, provides no details on the real name of the actor, nor is it listed on the movie’s promotional posters or closing credits. Producer KK Dheeraj has declined to reveal the name of the actor. In an earlier film promotion, Dheeraj said that he had been trying to get Mr. Bean to star in his movie for a year.

The unknown actor, who looks younger than the original Mr. Bean, mimics Atkinson’s brand of goofy physical comedy in a film about a hopping “pocong” ghost obsessed with the buxom dangdut singer Dewi Persik. Dheeraj insisted that the film’s title and the presence of a Mr. Bean look-alike was not deceiving.

“It’s no lie that the film is titled ‘Mr. Bean Kesurupan D.P.,’ it can clearly be seen in the movie,” Dheeraj said. “Nothing is wrong with the movie. I said that the actor for Mr. Bean is from Britain. [The fake] Mr. Bean is also from Britain.”

“The spectators were not disappointed, they were satisfied watching the film,” he added.

Co-star Dewi said there was nothing odd about making a film with a Mr. Bean knockoff.

“It’s common in business, it can be done,” the singer via an instant message.

Meanwhile, the Indonesian Consumer Protection Foundation (YLKI) said Indonesian moviegoers who were deceived by the promotion of a fake Mr. Bean movie could file a lawsuit and ask for ticket refunds.

“For the theaters that have not screened the movie, better not do it,” Tulus Abadi, manager of YLKI, said on Saturday as quoted by Vivanews.com. “If consumers file a lawsuit, they can get compensation at least the same amount as the ticket price.”

“This is a violation to the film’s consumers. The film association should strongly warn related parties regarding this problem.”